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21st January

 Update: Emasculated with censor's scissors...

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New Zealand miserablists think the censorship of jokes on Wicked Campervans has been effective
Link Here  full story: Wicked Campervans...Un polictically correct adverts wind up Australian and New Zealand authorities
wicked van virginWicked Campers are known as a brash, unapologetic company that built its reputation on homourous slogans plastered across its vehicles.

But almost a year on from a nationwide furore that saw New Zealand's Chief Censor ban a handful of its vans from the road, the feeling is that the company has been somewhat tamed. Golden Bay's Pohara Campground assistant manager Leigh Johnson said:

They are not like they used to be 12 months ago. It think they have toned it down.

The film censor's ban meant that the specific vans were banned from public places in New Zealand and Wicked could face a fine of up to $200,000 per offence if it continued to use them.

Murchison's Riverside Holiday Park, leaseholder Robin Sandford, said it seemed:

All the bad ones had disappeared. I don't know if they have taken them off the road or what but we don't see a lot of them coming in here. I saw two in the last two weeks and there was nothing offensive on them. They were funny but they weren't offensive.

 

6th January

  Bristol Women's Voice recommends...

CD Universe - Buy Music CDs, TV on DVD, DVDs, Video Games for XBox, PlayStation 2 and Much More

CityFox Taxis
Link Here

city fox flyer with ugly ladyA Bristol taxi firm has generated a little outrage by resurrecting a previously controversial advert campaign suggesting that if beer goggles are kicking in then perhaps it's time to call a cab.

The campaign for CityFox taxis features male and female adverts of overweight people next to the slogan: if I start to look sexy book a taxi .

City Fox flyer with ugly manInevitably the advert featuring the woman has 'outraged' local feminists. Bristol Women's Voice said it was appalled by the ad as it reinforces harmful gender stereotypes and sends the message that women are to be judged by their physical appearance .

However there are no reports of the feminists being concerned about men being judged by their appearance.

The same theme was previously used by West Quay Cars of Southampton in 2015, and on that occasion, advert censors of the ASA dismissed complaints saying that the adverts were light hearted and would not cause widespread offence.

CityFox has now decided to scrap the campaign anyway. However CityFox told the Bristol Post that it would not apologise for the campaign which also featured a dishevelled male on a flyer aimed at female passengers.

 

10th November

  Stupid Stunts...

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Advert censor bans promotional competition for the film Nerve, claiming that even young adults need protection from seeing dangerous practises on TV
Link Here

Nerve DVD Emma RobertsA TV ad for a competition related to the film Nerve , seen on 3 August 2016, featured a voice-over that stated, Welcome to Nerve. Nerve is like truth or dare, minus the truth. To celebrate the release of Nerve, we are giving you the chance to win a cash prize. We just want you to show some nerve. Head to mtv.co.uk/nerve to choose a dare, then share it at @MTVUK with #MTVGOTNERVE to enter. Are you ready to play? . The voice-over was accompanied by scenes from the film, including a man on a skateboard holding onto the back of a moving car, a group of men jumping into the sea from a cliff, a man hanging from a crane, a man on a motorbike speeding through a red light, a woman walking across a ladder horizontally spanning the gap between two buildings, someone falling from a crane, and a man lying between train tracks as a train passed over him.

The ad was given a post-9 pm scheduling restriction by Clearcast, which meant that it should not be shown before 9 pm or in or around programmes made for, or likely to be of particular appeal to, children.

A complainant challenged whether the ad condoned or encouraged dangerous practices.

Assessment: Complaint upheld

The ad featured scenes showing young adults engaged in a succession of highly dangerous activities. Various scenes had the appearance of being filmed on mobile phones, including some which featured overlaid graphics to look like video clips on social media. A couple of scenes were shot as if the viewer were looking up through the screen of a smartphone, including a shot with overlaid social media-type graphics which showed a woman swiping the word ACCEPT . Those scenes established the film's theme of young people daring each other, via social media, to video themselves undertaking dangerous behaviour and post the video on social media as proof they had completed the challenge. We noted that the theme tapped into an ongoing trend in youth culture of young people challenging each other on social media into potentially dangerous behaviour, such as Neknominate and the Cinnamon Challenge .

We acknowledged the competition did not require participants to engage in any of the behaviour featured in the ad, and that some scenes showed the negative consequences of such behaviour. However, we considered that in the context of youth culture around social media challenges, the ad's challenge to viewers to show some nerve in accompaniment with the scenes of young people engaging in dangerous behaviour condoned, and was likely to encourage, behaviour that prejudiced health or safety. We acknowledged Clearcast had applied a scheduling restriction to prevent the ad being broadcast before 9 pm, but we considered that because it both condoned dangerous practices and was likely to encourage viewers, particularly teenagers and young adults, to engage in dangerous practices, it should not have been broadcast at any time. We concluded the ad therefore breached the Code.

The ad must not appear again in the form complained about.

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ASA logo

ASA (UK)
Advertising Standards Authority

The ASA group writes and enforces advertising rules across most of UK media (including websites as of 1st March 2011)

  • ASA administer the group, deal with complaints from members of the public and enforce the advertising rules

  • CAP, Committee of Advertising Practice,  write and advise about the non-broadcast advertising rules

  • BCAP, Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice,  write and advise about the broadcast advertising rules

Websites:
www.asa.org.uk
www.bcap.org.uk

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 Clearcast logo

Clearcast (UK)

Clearcast are not official regulators. They are a group funded by broadcasters. Clearcast maintain expertise about ASA/TV advertising rules for the benefit of broadcasters and advertisers.

Broadcast advertisers submit adverts to Clearcast for approval. Clearcast also assign child protection restrictions.

Clearcast decisions can be, and often are, challenged by the ultimate advertising censors of the ASA

Website:
www.clearcast.co.uk
 

RACC logo

Radio Advertising Clearance Centre (UK)

The RACC is not an official censor. It is funded by commercial radio stations to maintain expertise and provide advice about the current radio advertising rules.

Radio advertisers then pay copy clearance fees to the RACC.

Commercial radio stations have to ensure advertising compliance.

They must follow the rules of The BCAP UK Code of Broadcast Advertising.

Website:
www.racc.co.uk
 

Ofcom logo

Ofcom (UK)

Ofcom is the UK TV censor. Advertising on TV is usually left to the ASA. However in the case of TV channels which exist primarily to advertise premium rate telephone services (such as babe channels) Ofcom administer the censorship, but use broadcast advertising rules as maintained by BCAP.

Website:
www.ofcom.org.uk

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